news

Please find our list of news posts displayed below.

  • Art therapy for stress relief. A workshop dealing with stress relief through the use of art therapy is being held at the Centre for Creative Practices in Pembroke Street in Dublin next Thursday (November 6th). The aim of the workshop is to provide participants with art based techniques for reducing stress such as mandala making and mindfulness techniques through art. It  is designed ...
  • Danish visionary workshop – Dublin Danish visionary, mystic and musician, Lars Muhl  is holding a workshop in Dublin tomorrow (November 1st 2014) For many years Lars Muhl was a successful singer-songwriter who, as well as making music, also studied esoteric knowledge and the world’s religions. In 1996 he was struck down by an unexplained illness, which neither doctors nor alternative therapists could ...
  • Night shift diet can affect liver rhythms Night shift workers might are being advised to avoid foods high in iron which may disrupt the working of their livers. Those on night shifts have higher rates of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer because of the disruptions to their body’s circadian clock. The circadian clock in the brain, regulates sleep and eating but other body ...
  • Jet lag contributes to obesity Jet lag can contribute to obesity by disturbing the body’s daily rhythm. Like shift work, jet lag interferes with the body’s biological clock or circadian rhythms through the day-night cycle. This in turn affects the composition of the body’s microbial community leading to obesity and metabolic problems. “These findings provide an explanation for a long-standing and mysterious observation, ...
  • Post surgery pain helped by Jazz and silence Silence and jazz are both golden when it comes to helping patients recovering from surgery. Patients undergoing elective hysterectomies who listened to jazz music during their recovery experienced significantly lower heart rates. But the research also found that patients who wore noise-cancelling headphones also had lower heart rates as well as less pain. The scientists who made the ...
  • Boost kids brain power with exercise Children who want to improve at school can benefit from just two hours of extra physical activity a week. A study of 2,000 twelve year old has shown that increased physical activity stimulates learning and improves school performance. The young Swedish students were given two hours of extra play and motion activities a week in collaboration with ...
  • Autism helped by cabbage and broccoli ingredient Foods like broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage, known for claims they can help prevent certain cancers, have now been linked to easing classic behavioural symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A chemical derived from the vegetables called sulforaphane was given daily to a group of teenage boys and young men, aged between 13 and 27, ...
  • Mediterranean diet reverses metabolic syndrome A Mediterranean diet of olive oil and nuts can help reverse a condition suffered by about one in four adults which leaves them at risk of diabetes and heart disease. Metabolic syndrome is the presence of three or more factors like large waist, high blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides and high blood ...
  • Obesity in Irish children has stopped rising Childhood overweight and obesity rates have stopped rising among Irish primary school children. Although obesity rates remain high, with one in every four Irish children obese or overweight, there is evidence that the problem has stabilized and the rates may be beginning to fall. Researchers at University College Cork and University College Dublin  studied the obesity rates ...
  • Decaf coffee may be good for the liver Decaf coffee may be good for the liver. Coffee of any kind has been found to protect the liver and may help lower the risk of developing diabetes, heart disease, non-alcholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and liver cancer. It operates by lowering levels of abnormal liver enzymes. The latest study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute in ...
  • Winter cold can help you lose body fat Winter can help you lose weight but not if you are already obese. Exposure to cold temperatures can convert white fat tissue from the thighs and belly to beige fat that burns calories for heat. Unfortunately in people who are already very overweight this biological response is hampered. Brown fat known as brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a ...
  • Bellydancers feel good in their bodies Belly dancers like their bodies and are less critical of their own looks. The hold a more positive image of their bodies and are less likely to be dissatisfied with their shape, size and weight. They take part in the dance because its fun and because they get to perform interesting movements, says Marika Tiggemann who carried ...
  • Short walks offset harm of prolonged sitting The health harm to leg arteries from hours of prolonged sitting at a desk can be reversed by short walks. Three short – even slow – five minute walks can reverse the harm of three hours prolonged sitting. Long periods of sitting at work or in front of the TV are associated with higher cholesterol and thicker ...
  • Fish oil can reduce epileptic seizures Low doses of fish oil may help to curb the frequency of epileptic seizures. The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil have been found to cross over from the bloodstream in heart cells. There they stabilize heart rhythm and protect against heart attacks which is particularly important for people with epilepsy because they have a higher ...
  • Office plants increase worker productivity Green plants in the workplace can increase productivity by as much as 15pc. Bringing greenery into offices makes staff happier and more productive. A study in two large commercial offices in the UK and the Netherlands found that plants significantly increased workplace satisfaction, self reported levels of concentration and perceived air quality. Cardiff University’s  Marlon Nieuwenhuis said: “Our ...
  • Two in three students addicted to phones Almost two thirds of college students admit they may be addicted to their mobile phone. Female students spend an average of 10 hours a day on their mobiles while their male counterparts spend nearly eight, according to a new study. This high level of phone use “poses potential risks for academic performance” says the Baylor University study. The ...
  • A simple thank-you can win you friends. A warm thank-you to a new acquaintance makes them more likely to keep up the relationship. “Saying thank you provides a valuable signal that you are someone with whom a high quality relationship could be formed,” says University of  South Wales psychologist Dr Lisa Williams, who conducted the research with Dr Monica Bartlett of Gonzaga University ...
  • Facial expression reveals underlying heart condition Your facial expression can reveal a treatable but dangerous heart condition. With the assistance of a web camera the face can reveal whether the person is experiencing atrial fibrillation – an irregular or sometimes rapid heart rate. A pilot study has demonstrated that subtle changes in skin colour can reveal the uneven blood flow caused by the ...
  • Free School Bag Posture Checks Is your child wearing their schoolbag correctly.  In-Health Chiropractic with clinics in Cavan and Monaghan is offering a service from September 1st to 12th to assess this. Children will be given a free spinal check and be shown the correct way to wear a schoolbag. The schoolbags will also be weighed. Anyone who wants to avail of the ...
  • Trinity College autism researchers appeal for participants The Autism Study Research Group at Trinity College in Dublin has appealed for participants to help them with a study to help them find out more about the causes of Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC).. The team is seeking people with high function ASC  to become part of an MRI study “exploring Theory of Mind in high ...
  • Gardens good for dementia patients Gardens in care homes have non-drug benefits for patients with dementia. A review of 17 different pieces of research has found that outdoor spaces can promote relaxation, encourage activity and reduce residents agitation. It was found that the care home gardens offered spaces where patients could interact with visitors and the gardens also helped to stimulate memories ...
  • Sunshine vitamin halves risks for bowel cancer patients Bowel cancer patients with high levels of Vitamin D in their blood can cut their risk of dying by 50pc compared to those with the lowest levels of the vitamin. Those with with  the highest  levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a study shows. The study is the first ...
  • Avocados increase Vitamin A value from other foods Fresh avocados are not just good eaten by themselves but enhance the absorption of essential nutrients from other foods. More vitamin A is absorbed from tomatoes or carrots when they are eaten with Avocados. Vitamin A is involved in reproductive health and growth promotion; helps support healthy skin, immune function, and vision; and has antioxidant properties. The research ...
  • Hotter days encourage kidney stones Hotter days increase the number of people seeking treatment for kidney stones and the most dramatic rise for the painful condition is among children. The link has been found in a study of 60,000 patients in areas with different climates. The researchers found that “as daily temperatures rise, there is a rapid increase in the probability of ...
  • Three day mindfulness course relieves stress Just 25 minutes of mindfulness for three consecutive days can alleviate psychological stress. New research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that it is not necessary to have lengthy training programmes in mindfulness to get good results. For the study 66 healthy people aged between 18 and 30 years  took part in a three day experiment. Some of them ...