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  • Chinese plant has potential as cancer cure   A plant used in traditional Chinese medicine is being investigated for medicinal compounds which may help treat cancer and liver disease. Compounds in the root of the plant can kill human cancer cells but leave the healthy cells untouched. Chinese skullcap – Scutellaria baicalensis – known in Chinese Medicine as Huang  –  is traditionally used as a ...
  • In Health Chiropractic moves to new Cavan address The In Health Chiropractic clinic is moving to The Elm House, Elm Bank, Cavan from May 3rd next. The new clinic will be on the ground floor of the building which also houses Citizens Advice and MABS. In Health Chiropractic treats a whole range of conditions from back and neck pain to headaches, shoulder and hip problems ...
  • Six step handwashing kills more bugs A six step hand washing technique for healthcare workers has been found to kill more bugs. The six steps, recommended by the World Health Organisation have been found to be superior to a three step procedure recommended by the US Centres for Disease and Control Prevention. “Hand hygiene is regarded as the most important intervention to reduce ...
  • Sunshine vitamin lowers invasive cancer risk The sunshine Vitamin D has been hailed as a “key prevention tool” for all types of invasive cancers. Higher levels of the vitamin in the blood show a measurable reduced cancer risk. Two brothers at San Diego School of Medicine first made the connection between the vitamin and some cancers in 1980. Cedric Garland and his later brother ...
  • Food as medicine theme of free online course Food as medicine is the subject of a three week online course being offered free by an Australian University. The course is designed to unravel the facts about food from myths and hype. Participants can choose from a course starting on May 2nd or one later in the year starting on October 23rd. Exploring food’s current role in ...
  • Bristles in your barbecue burger warning Wire bristles in your burger are a barbecue danger as the summer season approaches. Bristle grill brushes used to clean barbecue grates can leave loose wires which stick to the food during cooking. Thousands of people have ended up in Hospital emergency departments over the last decade suffering from wire bristle injuries. The most common injury is to ...
  • Bilingual babies develop stronger mental skills Babies raised in bilingual homes have a head start in life. Their problem solving abilities and mental skills are stronger and the difference in brain activity can be measured as early as 11 months of age. Switching between languages allows them to routinely practice mental skills and also increases their ability to learn multiple languages at a ...
  • Get outdoors to improve your eyesight Sunshine and bright outdoor light hold the key to reducing the short-sightedness epidemic worldwide says an Australian expert. While the increasing use of computers and screens has been blamed for the surge in the problem. Prof Scott Read of Queensland University of Technology says this is not the case. Children need to spend at least two hours ...
  • Salmon during pregnancy impacts childhood asthma Oily fish during pregnancy may reduce the risk of asthma in babies. Women who ate salmon twice a week from week 19 of their pregnancy gave birth to children who were significantly less likely to have asthma. The children were tested at six months and then again at two to three years of age. The six month test ...
  • Blueberries protect against Alzheimers Blueberries, already known as a super food for lowering the risks of heart disease and cancer, have now shown potential in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. The berries are full of healthful antioxidants which have the potential to fight the devastating effects of this increasingly common form of dementia. Flavanoids called anthocyanins are thought to improve understanding. A ...
  • Bright light therapy helps cancer survivors Light therapy can help depression in cancer survivors. “Depressive symptoms are common among cancer survivors even years after treatment has ended” says Heiddis Valdimarsdottir, a cancer specialist at the Icahan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. At study at the school divided participants into a bright white light and a dim red light group. They used a light ...
  • Whey protein stops sugar spikes Whey protein for breakfast can help stop sugar spikes through the day and help in a weight loss programme. A large breakfast with whey protein, a medium sized lunch and a small dinner has proved to be a successful strategy for weight loss. The whey powder is a by-product of milk during cheese production and was better ...
  • Mindfulness at work improves focus, stress and work relationships Mindfulness and the workplace may sound like strange bedfellows but they make a good combination. Organizations like Google, Mayo Clinic and the United States Marine Corps use mindfulness training to improve workplace functioning. Bringing a culture of mindfulness into corporate culture helps focus and stress management. It also affects how employees work together. “Historically, companies have been reticent ...
  • Grapes good for more than wine-making Eating grapes is good for your eye health. Natural ingredients in the grapes help to promote antioxidant activity and so counter damage to the eye from oxidative stress. The fruit also seems to help preserve the structure of the retina in the eye, according to researchers at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at Miami Miller School of ...
  • Swiss give five therapies same status as conventional medicine Five complementary therapies are to be put on the same footing as conventional medicine in Switzeraland. The interior ministry has decided to apply the “principle of trust” for homeopathy, holistic medicine, herbal medicine, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. They will acquire the same status as conventional medicine by May 2017. Two thirds of the population backed the inclusion ...
  • Just a sniff of drink can affect judgement Even a sniff of alcohol can make it harder for people to control their behavior. A study where half the participants wore a face-mask laced with alcohol and the other half wore one with a non-alcoholic citrus solution showed that the alcohol mask group were more prone to mistakes. Those taking part were instructed to press a ...
  • Rugby stars lead the way in mental wellbeing initiative Rugby star Jack McGrath’s brave and powerful story about coping with his brother’s suicide has launched a new campaign involving Ireland’s top rugby players. As part of the “Tackle Your Feelings” campaign the players reveal their own emotional vulnerabilities to encourage other people to tackle feelings head-on before they reach crisis levels. Women’s rugby player Hannah Tyrrell ...
  • Spiritual Intuitive Energy Healing – Trisha Moloney Interview of the week with Clodagh Sheehy The sensation of two Angels jolting her across her bed was the turning point for Trisha Moloney. Trisha’s quality of life had been affected by severe headaches brought on by a car crash 10 years previously.Her doctor had just told her that surgery was the next step with the chance ...
  • Drowsy night shift workers more likely to crash cars Night shift workers are at high risk of car crashes when returning home after work. Nearly 40pc of shift workers who took part in a test drive after a night shift were involved in a near crash event. Those who commute home after an overnight shift are at highest risk for drowsy driving crashes because of the ...
  • Kitchen sink stress buster  Head for the kitchen sink after a long day at work to practice the latest in stress busting. Mindful dishwashing has been found to cut anxiety by 27pc and increase mental inspiration by 25pc. All you have to do is focus on the smell of the soap, the warmth of the water and the feel of the ...
  • Meditation eases pain of cancer biopsy Meditation eased pain, anxiety and fatigue in women undergoing a breast cancer biopsy. Music was also effective but to a lesser extent. The group using guided loving-kindness meditation focused on building positive emotions towards the patients themselves and others and on releasing negative emotions. Patients in the music group listened to their choice of instrumental jazz, classical piano, ...
  • Filing information while you sleep A good night’s sleep helps the brain to file away important information from the activities of the day. Patterns of brain activity from the day are replayed at fast-forward speed during sleep. This helps strengthen microscopic connections between the nerve cells in a process which is deemed critical for consolidating memories. As the daytime events are replayed during ...
  • The health price of the energy drink buzz The buzz of energy drinks can come with a health price. Drinking two cans a day, six days a week for three weeks resulted in an abnormal heart rhythm and a slight blood pressure increase for participants in a recent study. The changes occurred while drinking the energy beverage and lasted for about two hours afterwards. “While we ...
  • Inspiration, Lizard men and Homeopathy http://irishhealing.ie/healing/blog/ http://irishhealing.ie/healing/blog/      
  • Wine and beer good for you – in small amounts Wine, beer and spirits have got the thumbs up from the medical profession but only “a little a day”. Alcohol “does more good than harm for your heart when consumed in moderation” says Imre Janszky, professor of social medicine at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. It doesn’t even matter what kind of tipple you favour. “It’s ...