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Please find our list of news posts displayed below.

  • Immune system could hold key to weight loss Eating less to lose weight does not work for everyone. Now a team including Irish scientists  have discovered your immune system plays a major role in regulating body weight. It could be responsible for as much as 40pc of your body’s ability to regulate weight. The team of researchers who made this ground breaking discovery includes Prof ...
  • iPads as effective as sedatives before child surgery Distracting children with iPads before surgery lowers their anxiety as much as conventional sedatives. Even the children’s parents were happy with the results of using the iPads. New research presented to the World Congress of Anaesthesiologists shows the the interactive computer pads reduced separation anxiety for the children who had to leave their parents to go into ...
  • Danger lurking in the swimming pool Before you jump into the enticing waters of the swimming pool you might want to consider the consequences. Disinfectant used to clear the water has been found to form by-products in the pool which corrode stainless steel fittings. Scientists are now concerned about the effect of these products on human skin. Sweat and urine The disinfection chemicals, like chlorine, ...
  • Sports head injuries can last years Sports head injuries can cause damage which lasts for months or even years. Footballers also get more head injuries from collisions with another player than from hitting the ground, a goalpost or some other object. The head injuries can shrink parts of the brain related to decision making by up to 20pc and reduce brain blood flow ...
  • Wearing make-up can make other women jealous Wearing make-up will make other women see you as “dominant” but men will see you as “prestigious”. Women who wear make-up are perceived differently by men and by other women. Other women can be jealous of a woman wearing cosmetics and perceive her as a threat, according to a psychology study at the University of Stirling. They can ...
  • Broccoli joins superfood ranks Broccoli has joined the ranks of the superfoods. The array of health benefits associated with the vegetable now include cutting the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma and several types of cancer. The secret is in the phenolic compounds of broccoli which have a high antioxidant effect. There is increasing evidence that this can block pathways ...
  • Americans spend €27bn on complementary healthcare Americans spend just under €27 billion a year on complementary healthcare. The most popular therapies are Chiropractic, Osteopathy, Yoga, Meditation and Massage. The most popular supplements include fish oils, glucosamine, probiotics, melatonin, Coenzyme Q10 and echinacea. The figure of €27 billion includes €1.6 billion on alternative healthcare for children, according to a nationwide annual survey. The study found that ...
  • Tantalising fat makes ice cream irresistible It’s the fat that makes ice-cream, chocolate and cheese so irresistible. Fat free ice cream won’t stay on the tongue long enough to give that lingering, rich, creamy flavor. These tempting food are full of fatty acids and a sweet-tasting glycerol molecule known as TAGs. TAGs are essential to the body but and excess can lead to problems ...
  • Music soothes during eye surgery Relaxing music before eye surgery helps patients feel less anxious and reduces their need for sedation. The patients cannot wear headphones during the operation because of the liquids used in the procedure. The effects of the pre-surgery music, however, last for up to 60 minutes after the music has stopped. A study on patients having cataract operations under ...
  • Chinese plant has potential as cancer cure   A plant used in traditional Chinese medicine is being investigated for medicinal compounds which may help treat cancer and liver disease. Compounds in the root of the plant can kill human cancer cells but leave the healthy cells untouched. Chinese skullcap – Scutellaria baicalensis – known in Chinese Medicine as Huang  –  is traditionally used as a ...
  • In Health Chiropractic moves to new Cavan address The In Health Chiropractic clinic is moving to The Elm House, Elm Bank, Cavan from May 3rd next. The new clinic will be on the ground floor of the building which also houses Citizens Advice and MABS. In Health Chiropractic treats a whole range of conditions from back and neck pain to headaches, shoulder and hip problems ...
  • Six step handwashing kills more bugs A six step hand washing technique for healthcare workers has been found to kill more bugs. The six steps, recommended by the World Health Organisation have been found to be superior to a three step procedure recommended by the US Centres for Disease and Control Prevention. “Hand hygiene is regarded as the most important intervention to reduce ...
  • Sunshine vitamin lowers invasive cancer risk The sunshine Vitamin D has been hailed as a “key prevention tool” for all types of invasive cancers. Higher levels of the vitamin in the blood show a measurable reduced cancer risk. Two brothers at San Diego School of Medicine first made the connection between the vitamin and some cancers in 1980. Cedric Garland and his later brother ...
  • Food as medicine theme of free online course Food as medicine is the subject of a three week online course being offered free by an Australian University. The course is designed to unravel the facts about food from myths and hype. Participants can choose from a course starting on May 2nd or one later in the year starting on October 23rd. Exploring food’s current role in ...
  • Bristles in your barbecue burger warning Wire bristles in your burger are a barbecue danger as the summer season approaches. Bristle grill brushes used to clean barbecue grates can leave loose wires which stick to the food during cooking. Thousands of people have ended up in Hospital emergency departments over the last decade suffering from wire bristle injuries. The most common injury is to ...
  • Bilingual babies develop stronger mental skills Babies raised in bilingual homes have a head start in life. Their problem solving abilities and mental skills are stronger and the difference in brain activity can be measured as early as 11 months of age. Switching between languages allows them to routinely practice mental skills and also increases their ability to learn multiple languages at a ...
  • Get outdoors to improve your eyesight Sunshine and bright outdoor light hold the key to reducing the short-sightedness epidemic worldwide says an Australian expert. While the increasing use of computers and screens has been blamed for the surge in the problem. Prof Scott Read of Queensland University of Technology says this is not the case. Children need to spend at least two hours ...
  • Salmon during pregnancy impacts childhood asthma Oily fish during pregnancy may reduce the risk of asthma in babies. Women who ate salmon twice a week from week 19 of their pregnancy gave birth to children who were significantly less likely to have asthma. The children were tested at six months and then again at two to three years of age. The six month test ...
  • Blueberries protect against Alzheimers Blueberries, already known as a super food for lowering the risks of heart disease and cancer, have now shown potential in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. The berries are full of healthful antioxidants which have the potential to fight the devastating effects of this increasingly common form of dementia. Flavanoids called anthocyanins are thought to improve understanding. A ...
  • Bright light therapy helps cancer survivors Light therapy can help depression in cancer survivors. “Depressive symptoms are common among cancer survivors even years after treatment has ended” says Heiddis Valdimarsdottir, a cancer specialist at the Icahan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. At study at the school divided participants into a bright white light and a dim red light group. They used a light ...
  • Whey protein stops sugar spikes Whey protein for breakfast can help stop sugar spikes through the day and help in a weight loss programme. A large breakfast with whey protein, a medium sized lunch and a small dinner has proved to be a successful strategy for weight loss. The whey powder is a by-product of milk during cheese production and was better ...
  • Mindfulness at work improves focus, stress and work relationships Mindfulness and the workplace may sound like strange bedfellows but they make a good combination. Organizations like Google, Mayo Clinic and the United States Marine Corps use mindfulness training to improve workplace functioning. Bringing a culture of mindfulness into corporate culture helps focus and stress management. It also affects how employees work together. “Historically, companies have been reticent ...
  • Grapes good for more than wine-making Eating grapes is good for your eye health. Natural ingredients in the grapes help to promote antioxidant activity and so counter damage to the eye from oxidative stress. The fruit also seems to help preserve the structure of the retina in the eye, according to researchers at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at Miami Miller School of ...
  • Swiss give five therapies same status as conventional medicine Five complementary therapies are to be put on the same footing as conventional medicine in Switzeraland. The interior ministry has decided to apply the “principle of trust” for homeopathy, holistic medicine, herbal medicine, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. They will acquire the same status as conventional medicine by May 2017. Two thirds of the population backed the inclusion ...
  • Just a sniff of drink can affect judgement Even a sniff of alcohol can make it harder for people to control their behavior. A study where half the participants wore a face-mask laced with alcohol and the other half wore one with a non-alcoholic citrus solution showed that the alcohol mask group were more prone to mistakes. Those taking part were instructed to press a ...